Bottles

BottlesUp Featured in New “Discover Design” at 2011 International Home + Housewares Show

This year at the International Home + Housewares Show in Chicago, we’ll be one of 50 companies invited in to the special “Discover Design” section. This invitation-only area will be the section retailers have been asking for – a section dedicated to highly-styled products that will generate interest and excitement with their customers. We’ll be debuting our beautiful glass water bottles, made using ancient techniques in a modern glass-making facility. Our bottles, made up of a minimum of 75% recycled glass and food-grade silicone caps and ‘grippers’, highlight the beauty of glass. Our responsible design (created by a nationally-acclaimed glass artist), sourcing (100% sourced and made in North America) and packaging deliver a product that looks good, feels good and does good. Glass is naturally BPA-free and PVC-free, it won’t leach harmful chemicals, it leaves no residual odor or taste.  The bottle is designed to fit the natural grasp of the hand and has a wide mouth with a rounded lip.  Adding to that, we don’t use any plastics in our bottle or in our packaging – none, nada, zilch. By using glass instead of plastic, the use of one BottlesUp glass water bottle can keep 240 plastic bottles out of landfills every year.  Wouldn’t you agree the combination of beauty, functionality, and responsibility is one you’d like to see?

If you’re heading to the IHA show in Chicago, come by Booth #3971.  Come see the true beauty of glass in a better, more responsible bottle.

BottlesUp Glass Water Bottles

Glass Water Bottles from BottlesUp

For Valentine’s Day, I’m sharing the love – take a sneak peak at our glass water bottles that we’re set to debut this March.  You can see the beauty of the glass – the result of its design and of how it’s made. It’s a beautiful process, have you seen it?

BottlesUp to Debut at Int’l Home + Houseware Show in March

In just a few weeks, we’ll be debuting BottlesUp glass water bottles at the acclaimed International Home and Housewares Show in Chicago.  From March 6-8, more than 60,000 people from around the world will come to see the latest, greatest and most interesting products available for the home and housewares. With more than 21,000 retail buyers coming to the show, we hope they’ll take the opportunity to bring BottlesUp glass water bottles to you. Our blend of design, beauty, functionality, responsibility – all in one bottle – can make a difference for your health and the environment.

If you’re going to the show in Chicago and want to connect, feel free to email us at jschmitt(at)cloudspark(dot)com. And if you’d like to share any of Chicaog’s best new dining secrets, our foodie team would be very thankful.

The Carbon Footprint of Everyday Things

I like to follow the good blogs over at GE’s Ecomagination site.  Recently, they posted this interactive infographic that allows you to see the carbon footprint of everyday things – from diapers to ironing a shirt to imported wine, from all flights every day to the energy consumed in the U.S. every year.  It’s an easy infographic to use (I’ll admit, I spent most of my lunch time yesterday clicking through the chart) and it certainly has me thinking a lot more about my own personal carbon footprint.

It’s this kind of impact that focused BottlesUp to a commitment to having the lowest carbon footprint in the water bottle industry.  Our entire product is made in North America and much of the materials are sourced onsite, further reducing our carbon footprint.  Adding to our low carbon footprint is another fact – you won’t find a single ounce of plastic in our product or in our packaging.  We’re commited to creating a product better for your health and the environment.

Why is Glass Green?

Source: Flickr, Slumped Green Glass by salient913

Believe it or not, this is a relatively common question we get about glass. While most glass is tranparent when it’s thin, the thicker glass gets, the more it takes on a green tinge.  Why?  Ordinary glass, which is made of a soda-lime base (no petroleum required in this material), contains iron-oxide.  For those of you into the chemical side, that’s FeO, also called ferris oxide. When thin, you don’t notice any color, but as this ordinary glass gets thicker, it takes on a green tinge from the iron-oxide impurities which are common.  Now, certain green soda or wine bottles you see take on that green hue thanks to the iron oxide, but also to the addition of chromium-oxide which makes it even more colorful.  On the opposite side, if you want to take out the green tinge to ordinary glass, you can add magesium-oxide. 

And who said chemistry wasn’t fun?
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