Consumption

Save Money? Calculate the Cost of Bottled Water

Here’s an easy way to save money that even the Daily Worth folks might just like: stop drinking bottled water. Instead use readily available tap water and a resuable glass water bottle. This one small step might just save you nearly $1,000 a year. How’d we find that number? The team over at New American Dream developed this handy bottled water cost calculator to help you understand just how much money you can save by making the switch.  

Go ahead, see how much you can save. 

And, after you calculate your savings, start planning what you might do with all that new-found money and let us know. Here’s how we plan to share our savings – by reinvesting into our local communities.

Yellow Pages Offers an Option to Opt Out

Yellow Pages now allows you to opt out.

If you’re like me, you’re one of the more than 70% of Americans who rarely or never look at the Yellow Pages – the behemoth book of business listings that comes unannounced to our doorsteps. I live in an area where I get not just one, but four different of these kinds of books every year.  Four! And while, I faithfully recycle these books, but the damage is done. They were already printed, transported and delivered wasting precious resources on a product few of us use in our homes.

Now, however, we can opt out of receiving any of the Yellow Pages that litter our doorsteps, thanks to the trade association that manages Yellow Pages.  To opt out, click over to www.yellowpagesoptout.com and register. You have to enter your address and phone number, but a note from the trade association on the page promises that this information won’t be used for any purpose other than the opt out

It’s not just by recycling plastic and using resuable glass water bottles that can help your health and the environment, you can stop paper waste from showing up at your doorstep with one easy click.

Wasteful Plastic Packaging for Food

There are several areas where plastics are helpful, where their lighter weight can save tons in shipping costs and fuel expenditures (really, another reason to buy local, but that’s another post). Yesterday, we came across this slide show from The Daily Green of the six worst offenders in food plastic packaging.  You look at the slides and are astounded to see the packaging for such small products all in the name of convenience and the guise of “portion control.” 

Here’s a better solution: buy food local, buy in bulk, and personally package it in reusable containers. I’m partial to these glass containers for food storage and these snack bags for food portability.  What do you think is packaging a small price for convenience? Or do you have other reusable suggestions for how to better package our food? Share them here.

The Carbon Footprint of Everyday Things

I like to follow the good blogs over at GE’s Ecomagination site.  Recently, they posted this interactive infographic that allows you to see the carbon footprint of everyday things – from diapers to ironing a shirt to imported wine, from all flights every day to the energy consumed in the U.S. every year.  It’s an easy infographic to use (I’ll admit, I spent most of my lunch time yesterday clicking through the chart) and it certainly has me thinking a lot more about my own personal carbon footprint.

It’s this kind of impact that focused BottlesUp to a commitment to having the lowest carbon footprint in the water bottle industry.  Our entire product is made in North America and much of the materials are sourced onsite, further reducing our carbon footprint.  Adding to our low carbon footprint is another fact – you won’t find a single ounce of plastic in our product or in our packaging.  We’re commited to creating a product better for your health and the environment.

BPA-Free for Your Health

Levels of BPA found in the human body according to The Environmental Working Group.

Back in the 1950s, we all thought plastics were going to be the “it” material of the future. Without regard for health or environment, we went full throttle ahead and plastic became a way of our everyday lives. But some progress comes at a cost.

Bisphenol A, commonly called BPA, is a controversial manufactured chemical found in the lining of food cans, certain plastic water bottles and other plastic containers. Researchers have linked the hormone-mimicking chemical (it mimics estrogen) to a host of health issues for adults, children and babies. Among the potential links – behavioral and developments effects, especially in growing babies and kids. The smart folks over at Consumer Reports just this past winter called into question the safety of BPA in any food or beverage container.

While more than 8 billion tons of BPA are produced a year, we’re one company committed to being BPA-free. All of our bottles, accessories and packaging are BPA-free and because we’re committed to health and environment, our bottles, accessories and packaging are 100% free of any plastics. Our bottles are made from recycled glass and our grippers and caps are made from 100% food-grade silicone. Rest assured, with BottlesUp, you’re getting a product designed with better health in mind.

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