plastics

The Cost of Plastics in Our Oceans

There are so many organizations helping to raise the awareness of the damage done by plastics to our health and our environment. Our friends at the Surfrider Foundation, have a great Rise Against Plastics campaign, asking folks to pledge an effort to end their use of single-use plastics.  What we had to share though, was this creative and compelling video that, in a very simple way, shows the damage to marine life of plastics in our oceans.

What other great projects have you heard about?

BPA-Free for Your Health

Levels of BPA found in the human body according to The Environmental Working Group.

Back in the 1950s, we all thought plastics were going to be the “it” material of the future. Without regard for health or environment, we went full throttle ahead and plastic became a way of our everyday lives. But some progress comes at a cost.

Bisphenol A, commonly called BPA, is a controversial manufactured chemical found in the lining of food cans, certain plastic water bottles and other plastic containers. Researchers have linked the hormone-mimicking chemical (it mimics estrogen) to a host of health issues for adults, children and babies. Among the potential links – behavioral and developments effects, especially in growing babies and kids. The smart folks over at Consumer Reports just this past winter called into question the safety of BPA in any food or beverage container.

While more than 8 billion tons of BPA are produced a year, we’re one company committed to being BPA-free. All of our bottles, accessories and packaging are BPA-free and because we’re committed to health and environment, our bottles, accessories and packaging are 100% free of any plastics. Our bottles are made from recycled glass and our grippers and caps are made from 100% food-grade silicone. Rest assured, with BottlesUp, you’re getting a product designed with better health in mind.

The (Not So) Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Have you heard about it – the large patch of floating plastic in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. It’s there, it’s real and what you may not know is that it’s not made up of plastic bags and empty bottles. It’s made up of billions of tiny pieces of plastic, and it’s basically invisible unless you’re floating in it. While this might seem better to be in tiny pieces, it’s actually much worse for the environment—and for you. The great team at GOOD, develop this Transparency – a look at the Pacific Gyre and the plastic floating in it.

Gyre illustration by Jacob Magraw-Mickelson

What do you think? How can we help minimize plastic in our oceans?